Forgery

Forgery Charges in Milwaukee

Speak with a Milwaukee White Collar Crimes Lawyer

In the state of Wisconsin, any attempt to defraud somebody by creating a false instrument, such as a worthless check, fake contract, or other document can be found guilty of the crime of forgery. Wisconsin statutes § 943.38 and 943.39 break down the different actions that are considered forgery. In general, there are two ways in which this crime can be committed: using a forged instrument to attempt to commit fraud (also called “utterance”) and creating a fraudulent document.

Some examples of forgery can include:

  • Writing a false or worthless check
  • Falsifying corporate records for fraudulent or personal gain
  • Obtaining a signature by fraudulent means
  • Forging a signature on a document for the use of fraud
  • Possessing a forged document with the intent to use it fraudulently

Get Representation Now

When you are facing charges of forgery, it’s easy to become stressed and overwhelmed emotionally. You may not know what to expect or how to defend yourself. When you’re struggling with this pressure, it’s important to reach out for help and retain the services of a skilled Milwaukee white collar crimes attorney who can act as a powerful ally on your side.

At the Law Offices of Christopher J. Cherella, we have experience helping clients with white collar crime charges, and can provide you with quality counsel and dedicated, fearless representation that places your best interests as our number-one priority. We have tried cases in federal, state, and local courts, giving us the experienced edge you’re looking for.

Don’t wait! Call the Law Offices of Christopher J. Cherella today at (414) 882-8382 to request a case evaluation and start assembling your hard-hitting criminal defense.

Penalties for Forgery

If you’re found guilty of forgery, the penalties you face will depend on the circumstances of your offense. In rare circumstances, forgery is considered a Class A misdemeanor, which could carry up to nine months in jail and a fine of up to $10,000. However, the majority of forgery charges are actually Class H felonies, meaning you could face up to six years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. Talk to an attorney about your options as soon as possible.

Looking for legal representation? Contact the Law Offices of Christopher J. Cherella online now!

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